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20120930
20121008
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CNN 4
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNN
Oct 5, 2012 10:00pm PDT
something like this and how could she get away with it so long? we talk to dan ariely, writer of "the honest truth about honesty." he joins us now. obviously you don't know this woman, you haven't interviewed her. what seems strange about this is it doesn't seem like there was any inherent reason for her to do that because she wasn't involved in the cases. >> usually when we look at crimes, any kind of crimes, we think it's just about selfish motivation. but the reality is, if you look a little deeper, it's not always just about selfish motivation. in this case it's particularly interesting because there are no selfish motivations. she was either thinking she was helping the justice system along, ending some evidence for them, or she was under tremendous pressure to do her work correctly and doing things -- >> and that this would somehow reflect positively on her. >> reflect positively on her, beibe the right thing for the organization. we've tested lots of people when they cheat, and usually when we look at criminals, we have a sense of saying it's them and not us. and we could never have d
CNN
Oct 5, 2012 5:00pm PDT
get away with it for so long. let's talk to dan aurielli, professor of psychology and behavioral economics at duke university. he joins us now. obviously you don't know this woman, you haven't interviewed her. but what's so strange to me about this, it doesn't seem like there was any inherent reason for her to do that, because there was no -- she wasn't involved in the cases. >> well, usually when we look at crimes, any kind of crimes, we think it's about just selfish motivations. but the reality is if you look a little deeper, it's often not about just the selfish motivations. in this case, it's particularly interesting because there are no selfish motivations. here she was, i can imagine one of two things. she was either thinking she was helping the justice system along, right, there was some kind of -- getting some evidence for that or she was under pressure to do her work correctly. >> this would somehow reflect positively on her? >> reflect positively on her, be the right thing for the organization. we've tested lots of people when they cheat and usually when we look at crim
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)